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Top 10 Pediatrician Certifications

This article provides an overview of the top certifications for pediatricians and information about how to obtain them.

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Brenna Goyette
Certified Professional Resume Writer, Career Expert

Published 19 min read

Certifications are an important factor in the job market for pediatricians. They demonstrate a level of skill and knowledge that employers look for when hiring medical professionals. Having certifications can help pediatricians stand out from other candidates, as it shows they have taken the extra time and effort to become certified in their field. Certifications also provide a way for employers to evaluate potential employees without having to conduct lengthy interviews or extensive background checks. Furthermore, certifications show dedication to the profession, which can be attractive to employers looking for reliable employees who are committed to their work.

The purpose of this article is to review and explain the benefits of obtaining certain certifications for Pediatricians, in order to help them advance their career.

What are Pediatrician Certifications?

Pediatrician certification is a process that pediatricians must complete in order to demonstrate their expertise in the care of children and adolescents. This certification requires completing an accredited residency program and passing an examination from the American Board of Pediatrics. Becoming certified provides assurance to parents, other healthcare professionals, and the public that the pediatrician has met the highest standards of educational and clinical training.

Having a board-certified pediatrician helps ensure that a child will receive safe, high-quality medical care. Pediatricians certified by the American Board of Pediatrics have completed additional years of residency training and passed rigorous examinations in order to demonstrate their knowledge in pediatrics. Board-certified pediatricians are required to maintain their certification by participating in continuing medical education activities and undergoing periodic re-examination.

Certification also ensures that a pediatrician has current knowledge about advances in pediatric care, including new treatments, medications, and technology related to pediatric health. In addition, board-certified pediatricians often have access to more resources for continuing education about childhood diseases and development than non-board-certified physicians.

Overall, having a board-certified pediatrician provides peace of mind for parents who want their children to receive the best possible care from knowledgeable physicians with comprehensive skills and experience.

Pro tip: Make sure to research the pediatrician certification requirements in your area before selecting a pediatrician. Different states and countries may have different regulations regarding pediatrician certifications, so it's important to understand what is required in order to ensure you are selecting a qualified professional.

Related: What does a Pediatrician do?

Top 10 Pediatrician Certifications

Here’s our list of the best certifications available to Pediatricians today.

1. American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) Certification

The American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) is a non-profit organization that provides board certification to pediatricians in the United States. This certification is granted after a physician has completed an accredited residency program, passed the ABP’s Certification Examination, and met all other requirements set by the ABP. The ABP Certification Examination consists of two parts: a written exam and an oral exam. The written exam covers topics such as general pediatrics, neonatal care, infectious diseases, nutrition, genetics, and adolescent medicine. The oral exam focuses on clinical knowledge and judgment.

It typically takes three to four years to complete the process of becoming board certified by the ABP. During this time period, physicians must complete a three-year accredited pediatric residency program and pass both parts of the ABP Certification Examination. After passing both exams, physicians must also meet additional requirements such as maintaining their medical license in good standing and completing continuing medical education credits every two years.

To become board certified by the ABP, physicians must first register for the certification examination through the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS). Once registered, they will be sent information about how to prepare for and take both parts of the examination. The cost for registration is $1,500 plus any applicable taxes or fees.

In summary, obtaining board certification from the American Board of Pediatrics requires completion of an accredited residency program followed by successful passage of both parts of its Certification Examination. This process typically takes three to four years and costs $1,500 plus applicable taxes or fees.

2. American Osteopathic Board of Pediatrics (AOBP) Certification

The American Osteopathic Board of Pediatrics (AOBP) is a non-profit organization that certifies osteopathic physicians who specialize in pediatrics. The AOBP certification process is designed to ensure that certified pediatricians have the knowledge and skills necessary to provide quality care for infants, children, adolescents, and young adults.

In order to become certified by the AOBP, physicians must first complete an accredited residency program in pediatrics. After completing the residency program, they must then pass an examination administered by the AOBP. The exam consists of both written and oral components, and covers topics such as medical ethics, patient safety, diagnosis and management of common pediatric diseases and disorders, preventive health care for children, and other related topics.

The certification process typically takes between two and three years to complete. During this time period, physicians must submit all required documentation to the AOBP for review before they can take the exam. Once all requirements are met and the exam is passed, physicians will receive their certification from the AOBP.

The cost of obtaining AOBP certification varies depending on a number of factors including residency program costs and exam fees. Generally speaking, it can range anywhere from several hundred dollars up to several thousand dollars or more.

3. American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Fellowship

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Fellowship is a program designed to provide pediatricians with advanced training in clinical practice, research, and/or teaching. The fellowship lasts for two years and is offered at a variety of locations throughout the United States. Fellows are expected to complete a minimum of 24 months of training in their chosen specialty area.

To be eligible for the AAP Fellowship, applicants must have completed an accredited pediatric residency program as well as hold a valid medical license in the state where they will be practicing. Applicants must also submit letters of recommendation from three pediatricians who can attest to their clinical skills, research capabilities, and teaching abilities.

The cost of the AAP Fellowship varies depending on the location and duration of training. Generally speaking, fellows are responsible for all costs associated with travel, housing, meals, and other expenses related to their fellowship. In addition, fellows may be required to pay tuition fees for any courses taken during their fellowship period.

Once accepted into the AAP Fellowship program, fellows will work closely with experienced faculty members who specialize in their chosen field of study. During this time, fellows will gain valuable experience working alongside leading experts in pediatrics while developing their own skills and knowledge base. Upon completion of the fellowship program, graduates are eligible to take board certification exams in their chosen specialty area.

4. Pediatric Endocrinology Subspecialty Certification

Pediatric Endocrinology Subspecialty Certification is a certification offered by the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP). This certification recognizes pediatricians who have completed an additional two years of specialized training in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of endocrine disorders in children. The certification process includes passing a comprehensive examination that tests knowledge and clinical skills in pediatric endocrinology.

The process to obtain Pediatric Endocrinology Subspecialty Certification typically takes three years. During this time, physicians must complete at least 24 months of full-time training in an accredited program approved by the ABP. In addition, they must pass the subspecialty examination administered by the ABP and fulfill all other requirements for board certification.

In order to get certified, physicians must first apply for eligibility through the ABP. They need to submit documentation that verifies their completion of an accredited program and provide information on their professional experience and qualifications. Once approved, they can register for the exam and pay a fee which varies depending on when they register but usually ranges from $1,500-$2,000 USD.

After completing all requirements successfully, physicians will receive their Pediatric Endocrinology Subspecialty Certification from the ABP. This certification is valid for 10 years before needing to be renewed with additional continuing medical education credits or another exam.

5. Pediatric Gastroenterology Subspecialty Certification

Pediatric Gastroenterology Subspecialty Certification is a certification program offered by the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP). It is designed to recognize individuals who have achieved a high level of expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric gastrointestinal disorders. The certification requires that applicants have completed an accredited fellowship program in Pediatric Gastroenterology, have at least three years of clinical experience in the field, and pass a comprehensive written examination.

The process to obtain Pediatric Gastroenterology Subspecialty Certification typically takes two to three years. First, applicants must complete an accredited fellowship program in Pediatric Gastroenterology. This usually involves two or more years of specialized training in the field. Once this has been completed, applicants can begin the application process for certification with the ABP. This includes submitting a detailed application packet, including transcripts from their fellowship program, letters of recommendation from faculty members and supervisors, and other documentation as required by the ABP.

Once an applicant’s application has been approved by the ABP, they will be invited to take the written examination for certification. This exam consists of multiple-choice questions covering topics such as anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, nutrition, pathology, diagnosis and management of pediatric gastrointestinal disorders. The exam takes approximately four hours to complete and costs $1,500 USD to register for it.

After passing the written examination, applicants must then submit documentation showing they have met all requirements for board eligibility within five years of passing their written exam. This includes completing at least 24 months (or 1 year if combined with another subspecialty) of clinical practice in pediatric gastroenterology after completing their fellowship program; participating in continuing medical education activities; publishing scholarly works; and demonstrating professional competence through peer review or performance improvement activities. Once these requirements are met, applicants will receive their certificate from the ABP recognizing them as board-certified Pediatric Gastroenterologists.

6. Pediatric Cardiology Subspecialty Certification

Pediatric Cardiology Subspecialty Certification is a certification program offered by the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) to physicians who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of heart problems in children. The certification process requires completion of an approved fellowship program, successful completion of a written and oral examination, and ongoing maintenance of certification.

The process typically takes four to five years to complete, depending on the individual’s experience and training. To get certified, applicants must first complete an accredited pediatric cardiology fellowship program. After completing the fellowship, applicants must pass both a written and oral exam administered by the ABP. Once certified, physicians must maintain their certification through continuing medical education activities every two years.

The cost for Pediatric Cardiology Subspecialty Certification varies depending on the applicant’s background and experience. The application fee is $1,200 for initial certification or $600 for recertification. Additional fees may apply for additional exams or other services.

7. Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Subspecialty Certification

Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Subspecialty Certification is a certification offered by the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) that recognizes physicians who have completed additional training and demonstrated expertise in caring for newborn infants and their families. The certification requires completion of an accredited fellowship program in neonatal-perinatal medicine, as well as successful passage of the Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Subspecialty Examination administered by the ABP.

It typically takes two to three years to complete an accredited fellowship program, depending on the individual's circumstances. After completing a fellowship program, applicants must submit their credentials to the ABP for review before taking the subspecialty examination.

The cost of obtaining Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Subspecialty Certification depends on several factors, such as whether or not you are already board certified in pediatrics and whether or not you are a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). For non-AAP members, there is an initial application fee of $1,000 plus a yearly maintenance fee of $500. For AAP members, there is no initial application fee but still a yearly maintenance fee of $500.

8. Pediatric Pulmonology Subspecialty Certification

Pediatric Pulmonology Subspecialty Certification is a certification program offered by the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) that recognizes pediatricians who have completed additional training in the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory disorders in children. The certification process involves completing an accredited fellowship program, passing a written examination, and completing an oral examination.

The fellowship program typically takes two years to complete. During this time, fellows are trained in advanced clinical skills related to pediatric pulmonology, including diagnosis and management of respiratory diseases such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and other airway disorders. Fellows also gain experience in research methods, teaching techniques, and quality improvement initiatives.

Once the fellowship has been completed, candidates must pass a written exam administered by the ABP. This exam covers topics such as pulmonary physiology and pathology; pharmacology; genetics; epidemiology; critical care; nutrition; sleep medicine; ethics; and end-of-life care. After passing the written exam, candidates must then complete an oral examination administered by the ABP. This consists of a series of questions related to patient cases presented to the candidate during the exam session.

The cost for Pediatric Pulmonology Subspecialty Certification varies depending on how many exams are taken and whether or not they are taken at different times or all at once. The fee for taking all three exams at once is $2,500 plus any applicable taxes or fees. Additionally, there may be additional costs associated with travel or lodging if necessary for taking the exams at different times or locations.

9. Pediatric Infectious Diseases Subspecialty Certification

Pediatric Infectious Diseases Subspecialty Certification is a certification program offered by the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) to recognize physicians who have achieved a level of expertise in the diagnosis, management, and prevention of infectious diseases in children. The program is designed to ensure that pediatricians who specialize in this field are knowledgeable and competent in providing high-quality care to their patients.

The certification process typically takes two years to complete and involves passing an examination, completing a minimum number of hours of clinical practice, and submitting letters of recommendation from colleagues. To be eligible for the certification, applicants must have completed an accredited residency training program in pediatrics and at least two years of additional fellowship training in pediatric infectious diseases.

To get certified, applicants must first apply online through the ABP website. After submitting all required documents and fees, applicants will receive an invitation to take the written examination which is administered twice a year. Once they pass the exam, they will be awarded their Pediatric Infectious Diseases Subspecialty Certification.

The cost for this certification varies depending on whether one is already board-certified or not. For those who are already board-certified, it costs $1,500; for those who are not yet board-certified, it costs $2,000.

10. Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Subspecialty Certification

Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Subspecialty Certification is a certification program that recognizes the specialized knowledge and skills of healthcare professionals who treat children with cancer and blood disorders. The certification is offered by the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) and provides recognition to those who have achieved a high level of expertise in the field.

In order to become certified, applicants must hold an MD or DO degree from an accredited medical school, be board-certified in pediatrics, have completed three years of fellowship training in pediatric hematology/oncology, and pass both written and oral exams. The certification process typically takes two to three years to complete depending on the applicant's experience.

The ABP offers two pathways for certification: the traditional pathway and the alternative pathway. For the traditional pathway, applicants must meet all eligibility criteria listed above as well as complete a minimum of 24 months of fellowship training in pediatric hematology/oncology. For the alternative pathway, applicants must meet all eligibility criteria listed above as well as complete a minimum of 12 months of fellowship training in pediatric hematology/oncology plus an additional 12 months of clinical practice in pediatric hematology/oncology.

The cost for taking the exam varies depending on which pathway you choose; however, it typically ranges from $1,500-$2,000 USD. Additionally, there are other fees associated with maintaining your certification such as annual fees and recertification fees every 10 years.

Do You Really Need a Pediatrician Certificate?

The answer to this question depends on the individual's circumstances. For some, a pediatrician certificate may be necessary in order to practice as a pediatrician or to obtain a job in a health care facility that requires such certification. In other cases, such certification is not required but could still be beneficial for those who wish to specialize in pediatrics.

For those interested in becoming a pediatrician, obtaining a pediatrician certificate can help demonstrate their commitment and knowledge of the field. It can also provide more credibility when applying for jobs or seeking promotion within the medical field. Certification can also help make the person more marketable and improve their chances of finding employment with higher pay or better benefits. Furthermore, having certification may also give them access to exclusive networking opportunities and resources that would otherwise not be available without it.

On the other hand, there are some people who might not need a pediatrician certificate because they do not plan on specializing in pediatrics or working in the medical field at all. Those who are simply interested in learning about pediatrics may find that taking courses at their local college or online is enough to gain an understanding of the subject matter without needing to become certified. Additionally, those who are already employed as nurses or physicians may find that they have enough experience and education to treat patients without needing additional credentials.

In conclusion, whether or not someone needs a pediatrician certificate really depends on their individual circumstances and goals. Becoming certified could benefit those looking for employment within the medical field by providing additional credibility and networking opportunities; however, it is possible for some individuals to gain an understanding of pediatrics through courses without needing certification.

Related: Pediatrician Resume Examples

FAQs About Pediatrician Certifications

1. How do I become a certified pediatrician?

Answer: To become a certified pediatrician, you must complete an accredited medical school program, followed by a three-year residency program in pediatrics. After completing the residency, you must pass the American Board of Pediatrics’ certification exam in order to become board-certified.

2. What is the difference between a pediatrician and a family doctor?

Answer: Pediatricians specialize in taking care of children from birth up to age 18. They are specifically trained to diagnose and treat childhood illnesses, infections, and injuries, as well as provide preventive care such as immunizations. Family doctors provide comprehensive health care for people of all ages, from infancy through adulthood.

3. Is certification mandatory for pediatricians?

Answer: Certification is not mandatory for practicing pediatricians; however, it is recommended that they obtain certification from the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) in order to demonstrate their competence and commitment to providing quality care to their patients.

4. Are there any other certifications or specialties I can pursue as a pediatrician?

Answer: Yes! In addition to ABP certification, there are several other certifications available for pediatricians who wish to specialize in specific areas such as neonatology (care of newborns), adolescent medicine (care of teens), sports medicine, or developmental/behavioral pediatrics (care of children with learning disabilities or behavioral issues).

5. How often do I need to renew my certification?

Answer: Certification must be renewed every 10 years in order to maintain your active status with the ABP. During this time period you must also participate in continuing medical education activities that are related to your specialty and maintain your professional licensure with your state medical board.